A (Parenthetical) Work in Progress...

Read the Printed Word!

This is my personal Tumblr. Here you will find anything from kittens, to Doctor Who, to my beliefs of hot button subjects.
If you're not interest in that and just want the writing go to http://crankywriting.tumblr.com
Recent Tweets @crankyashley

My phone’s wallpaper right now. Paperland Pro. Normally I have it set up to look like Seattle, but I wanted a change. I’m using the Halloween moon to make it a bit creepy.

readyforthe-revolution:

disciplesofmalcolm:

Stokely Carmichael (Kwame Ture)

"Dr. King’s policy was that nonviolence would achieve the gains for black people in the United States. His major assumption was that if you are nonviolent, if you suffer, your opponent will see your suffering and will be moved to change his heart. That’s very good.

He only made one fallacious assumption: In order for nonviolence to work, your opponent must have a conscience. The United States has none.”

(via queergiftedblack)

doctor-tiger-bitch:

barackthehalls:

neonshi:

milafawnkawaiielfgoddessangelic:

truthtellingtime:

Just so everybody knows, the mirror is actually more reliable than the camera. Even though people say “the camera never lies”, it distorts your photographs a little bit. It has to turn a 3d image (you in real life) to a 2d image (a photograph) and consequently skews the proportions a little bit.

Also, “photogenic” is a real thing. Certain faces photograph well and others don’t. It’s all down the angles, proportions and size of your features.

Have you ever seen someone stunning who looks great in professional photographs and not in candids? Yeah, that’s because there’s a huge difference between a professional and an amateur. Professionals know how to minimise the issues cameras have. Lighting, angles and even the distance you are away from the camera plays a part (the amount of distortion varies depending on how close you are).

TL;DR if you think you look great in the mirror but not in the photo, trust the mirror. You look great!

NOT ONLY THAT, but when you look in a mirror, you’re seeing your face in motion, how others would see it. In a photograph, you’re still, and it can make small flaws and the like seem a lot more prominent, despite them being quite minuscule in person.

Also! Also, when you see yourself in the mirror you are looking at you face reverse of how a camera pics it up. No face is perfectly symmetrical so you get so used to seeing a mirrored version of your face that when it’s flipped in a picture you subconsciously notice the tiny differences in your face and thus you think you don’t look right.

I have never felt so relieved and beautiful thank you guys

Also camera technology is inherently racist. It has issues probably taking pictures of darker skinned people.

(via vixyish)

petermorwood:

coelasquid:

sonneillonv:

underhuntressmoon:

voidbat:

explainervideo:

What happens to cats in zero gravity ?   more educational gifs«

OH GOD THOSE POOR BABIES i am sobbing i am laughing so hard

In the last pic the cat is all “oh thank god I found ground NO WAIT COME BACK GROUND”

THOSE POOR BABIES OMG WHY AM I LAUGHING AT THIS

Pigeons are even funnier in zero g, they don’t know which way is up and fly upside down 

"NO, WAIT, COME BACK, GROUND…!"

lauraroselam:

twigbookshop:

Here’s the thing: Tamora Pierce's Tortall books are not just a series. They are an experience. They are poring over maps at recess and arguing about the relative merits of Jon and George at summer camp.

They are deciding whether you are better suited to the Queen’s Riders or the Court of the Rogue, and telling all your friends what color their Gift would be.They are checking in on your favorite characters ten years later.

They are swords and gods and magical animals, but also bullies and bruises and a lot of hard work. They take girl power beyond easy cliche, and no cousin of mine gets through puberty without some exposure. 

These are books for the grown-or-growing Tortallans out there. 

Mistborn, by Brandon Sanderson 

Mistborn is at once a coming-of-age story about a girl learning to use her powers, a fantasy epic about a disparate group of rebels plotting the downfall of an evil empire, and an ambitious exploration of the power of legends and what it means to be a hero. 

She-Wolves: The Women Who Ruled England Before Elizabeth, by Helen Castor

She-Wolves looks at four of England’s powerful medieval queens, Eleanor of Aquitaine, Isabella of France, Margaret of Anjou, and the Empress Matilda, and the legends and legacy they would leave for future would-be rulers. 

The Privilege of the Sword, by Ellen Kushner 

For fencing practice, cross-dressing teenagers, high society, gender shenanigans, mad dukes, and duels. 

Flygirl, Sherri L. Smith 

Ida Mae Jones dreams of flight, so when the United States enters World War II, she hides her heritage to pass as white and join the WASP program. This is an exciting read about a compelling heroine, a group  of indomitable young women, and the complexities of race, gender and identity in America. 

Kushiel’s Dart, by Jacqueline Carey

Kushiel’s Dart opens the epic and immersive Kushiel’s Legacy series. The books are heavy on the sex, violence, and existential angst, without ever straying into the needlessly grimdark. As in Tortall, major themes include finding your place in the word, the different meanings of courage, and the gifts and burdens of being touched by a god. Also as in the Tortall books, new protagonists in subsequent generations allow readers to explore an ever-expanding world while keeping tabs on old friends. 

Princesses Behaving Badly, by Linda Rodriguez McRobbie 

Tackles the true stories of dozens of legendary princesses from around the world and across the centuries, without the fairy tale endings. 

Ash and Huntress, by Malinda Lo

For rebellious, flawed, powerful heroines, quests, romance, well-grounded world building, and mysterious, hostile creatures popping up where they’re not wanted. 

On Basilisk Station, by David Weber 

Those who ate up Daine’s improvised guerilla tactics and Kel’s wartime logistics and struggles as a leader will revel in military sci-fi with no-nonsense Captain Honor Harrington. 

The Secret History of the Mongol Queens, by Jack Weatherford 

Weatherford explores the fascinating lost history of the 13th century Mongol Empire and the women who fought for control of it. This is both a portrait of remarkable women and an examination of female power, legacy, legend, and the rewriting of history. 

The Vorkosigan Saga, by Lois McMaster Bujold

Bujold effortlessly juggles sub-genres and combines action, character development, philosophical and sociological questions, and laugh-out-loud humor in her world-spanning Vorkosigan books. Good starting points are Cordelia’s Honor (for space exploration, decapitations, romance, and a level-headed, butt-kicking heroine) and Young Miles (for coming-of-age, fighting to find a place in your society, spies, space battles, and an accidental army). 

The Assassin’s Apprentice, by Robin Hobb

Launches the classic fantasy series and the story of Fitz Farseer, bastard son of a prince and assassin-in-training. 

Rose Under Fire, by Elizabeth Wein 

When young American ATA pilot Rose is captured by German forces en route to England during World War II, she is sent to a notorious women’s POW camp. Amidst the horrors of Nazi power, she meets an extraordinary group of women fighting for their survival. 

Grave Mercy, Robin LaFevers

In Medieval Brittany, Ismae flees from an unwanted marriage to the sanctuary of St. Mortain, where a sisterhood of god-touched assassins teaches her a dozen ways to kill a man. But love, loyalty, politics, and fate are all more complicated than Ismae’s teachers will admit. 

The Beekeeper’s Apprentice, by Laurie R. King

Orphaned teenager Mary Russell, prickly, proud, very bright, stumbles across the now-retired Sherlock Holmes in Sussex. Literally. They’re a mismatched pair, but Holmes becomes Russell’s reluctant mentor and partner in detection. This is a fast-paced, very entertaining adventure story full of thrilling chases, far fetched disguises, villains, espionage and intrigue, which still manages to fit in laugh-out-loud moments, well-drawn characters, and feminist theology. 

Pantomime, by Laura Lam

For cities built on the ruins of mysterious civilizations, running away and joining the circus, magic and romance, and defying all the rules of gender, sex, and social expectation. 

The Warrior Queens, by Antonia Fraser 

The inimitable Lady Antonia Fraser offers a panoramic look at women rulers throughout history who have led armies and nations in times of war. 

Rosemary and Rue, by Seanan McGuire 

For Toby Daye, practical, put-upon, constantly snarking, who also happens to be a knight-errant of faerie. It’s hard to get by as a self-exiled changeling in modern San Francisco, and it’s harder when you’re getting dragged into murder, mayhem, and quests of mythic proportion.

Legends of Red Sonja, edited by Gail Simone 

Tamora Pierce has cited pulp comic book character Red Sonja—she of the chainmail bikini, swashbuckling swordplay, and questionable sexual politics—as a source of both inspiration and frustration. Now Gail Simone, comic book icon and writer on the current ongoing series, brings together big names in fantasy, including Tammy herself, to give us Red Sonja as never seen before. 

Previously in this series: The Giver Quartet 

I grew up reading a LOT of Tamora Pierce books, so to see this made me smile. :-)

wertheyouth:

When an undercover officer saw Monica Jones, a black transgender woman, walking down the street just a few blocks from her house, in an area that the officer described as being “known for prostitution,” that was enough to convince him that she intended to engage in prostitution. It was on that basis that he approached and stopped her.
In April of this year, Monica was convicted of violating this overbroad and vague law. Today she appeals that conviction, and the ACLU, along with other advocacy and civil rights organizations, filed a brief in support of her appeal.
We #StandWithMonica because transgender women of color should be able to walk down the street in their neighborhoods without being arrested, or worse, for simply being themselves.
When Walking Down the Street is a Crime. Chase Strangio, ACLU

wertheyouth:

When an undercover officer saw Monica Jones, a black transgender woman, walking down the street just a few blocks from her house, in an area that the officer described as being “known for prostitution,” that was enough to convince him that she intended to engage in prostitution. It was on that basis that he approached and stopped her.

In April of this year, Monica was convicted of violating this overbroad and vague law. Today she appeals that conviction, and the ACLU, along with other advocacy and civil rights organizations, filed a brief in support of her appeal.

We #StandWithMonica because transgender women of color should be able to walk down the street in their neighborhoods without being arrested, or worse, for simply being themselves.

When Walking Down the Street is a Crime. Chase Strangio, ACLU

(via queerwoc)

This is not the world I was promised in the 1960s when labor-saving devices were going to give us all deluxe lives of leisure. Instead, we scrabble over the remaining labor left to do, to avoid starving and homelessness, and the people who own the machines get unimaginably rich.
"Dwasifar" in a conversation we were having on how and why people choose to donate to what causes, and how the world we live in is one in which we have the technology but not the egalitarian belief or structure to take care of our world or ourselves. We now live in a world where technology affords us the chance at a new renaissance and yet we’re working jobs which don’t even give us a living wage or a way to take advantage of the research being done to keep us medically fit, let alone healthy.

micdotcom:

Potent minimalist art sends a strong message about police and vigilante brutality in America

Journalist and artist Shirin Barghi has created a gripping, thought-provoking series of graphics that not only examines racial prejudice in today’s America, but also captures the sense of humanity that often gets lost in news coverage. Titled “Last Words,” the graphics illustrate the last recorded words by Brown and other young black people — Trayvon Martin, Oscar Grant and others — who have been killed by police in recent years.

Let us not forget their voices

(via thisiseverydayracism)

Old Spice ALS Ice Bucket Challenge: You’re next Bruce Campbell

hierophilic:

outlawpoet:

aconnormanning:

"So many of us choose our path out of fear disguised as practicality"

Actual idol

when carrey is serious, it’s often devastating. i really wish he did more sincere stuff. 

holy fucking shit tho.

(via writingitout)